Finding Your Ancestors in the Records of the North Carolina State Archives – Sept 24

The Friends of the North Carolina State Archives Presents, “Finding Your Ancestors in the Records of the North Carolina State Archives”
Saturday, September 24, 2011

Click here for registration information

Location: North Carolina State Archives Auditorium, 109 East Jones St., Raleigh, NC

Schedule of Events:
9:00 AM – 9:30 AM Registration Walk-ins are welcome. However, lunch will not be available and the workshop handouts may not be available.
9:30 AM – 10:30 AM A Virtual Tour of the North Carolina State Archives by Debbi Blake
10:30 AM – 10:50 AM Break & Vendors
10:50 AM – 11:50 AM Tar Heels in the Family Tree? A Genealogical Introduction to North Carolina Records by Helen Leary, CG (Emeritus), FASG, FNGS
11:50 AM – 1:00 PM Lunch & Vendors
1:00 PM – 2:00 PM Get Excited about Your Pre-1870 N.C. African American Research: the N.C. Archives Can Put Great Resources at your Fingertips! by Diane Richard
2:00 PM – 2:20 PM Break & Vendors
2:20 PM – 3:20 PM Finding Your North Carolina Revolutionary War Soldier or Patriot by Kenny Simpson

Registration is $40.00

Parkwood Flea Market October 1, 2011

As many of you may know, October is Family History Month. In celebration of this, The Durham-Orange Genealogical Society will be hosting a table at a neighborhood flea market hosted by a local subdivision that many of us live in – Parkwood of Durham. See the announcement below:

D-OGS will have a table at the Parkwood Flea Market in which we will sell gently used items particularly genealogy books, magazines, software, etc, that our members have donated in addition to back issues of our Trading Path journal. We will also have membership brochures on hand to give out to interested parties. Please talk to Karen Vance if interested in donating or manning the table during this event.

Please join us on Revere Road in Durham, NC 27713  between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m.

(near Highway 54/55 intersection, former Parker Library location)

NC Genealogical Society Workshop on 29 October features Barbara Vines Little, CG

29 October 2011 Raleigh, NC at the North Carolina Museum of History, 5 East Edenton Street, Raleigh, NC 27601:

Researching Your Ancestors in Colonial Times will be presented by the North Carolina Genealogical Society in conjunction with the NCGS Annual Meeting. The Speaker will be Barbara Vines Little, CGSM, whose talks will provide the information that can move your research to the next level.

Working With Colonial Records – A look at how to effectively deal with the vagarities of colonial government and the lack of records.
Land and Inheritance – Understanding the law in regard to inheritance, especially of land, is an important tool in interpreting records. Without a thorough understanding of how real and personal property was inherited especially in an intestate estate or under the rules of primo-geniture and entail, it is impossible for the researcher to make accurate assumptions of relationships based upon the inheritance of land.

Backtracking Your Migrating Ancestor: A Methodology That Works – When an ancestor suddenly appears in an area with no obvious clue to his origin, many researchers are lost. Yet carefully combing for clues in the area in which he is found will often provide the answer. This lecture provides a framework for researchers to follow in their search for their ancestor’s origin.

Taxes: Milk Them for All They’re Worth! – Most often used as substitute census, tax lists, when interpreted properly, can provide a wealth of information on individuals, their occupations, families, lifestyles, and antecedents.

Registration and additional information available at: http://www.ncgenealogy.org

Author Carole Troxler visits Mebane Public Library

Troxler Book ImagesHistorians interested in pre-Revolutionary Alamance County will want to join local author Carole Troxler at the Mebane Public Library on
Tuesday, September 20th at 7:00pm. Dr. Troxler will talk about the topic of her latest book, “Farming Dissenters: The Regulator Movement in Piedmont North Carolina”.

Here is the book summary from Amazon: The Regulator Movement grew from the frustration of North Carolina’s backcountry residents–frustration with local officials who ran their offices for personal gain, disregarding the rights of the residents–frustration with a complicated land grant system that did not guarantee clear ownership of land–frustration with a colonial legislature dominated by eastern political and economic interests. In this new study, Dr. Carole Troxler steps back more than two decades before the pivotal Battle of Alamance (May 16, 1771) to examine the issues and their cultural context that fostered the Regulator Movement and determined its progress, and political aftermath. This is the story of local government more interested in its needs than those of its constituents–and of settlers steeped in the Dissenter religious culture who drew on its political orientation to risk activism often cited as a prelude to the American Revolution.

Dr. Troxler is also the co-author of “Shuttle and Plow: A History of Alamance County, North Carolina”.

Wake County Genealogical Society Meeting – Sept 27, 2011

Date: Tuesday, September 27, 2011
Time: 7:00 p.m.
Place: Olivia Raney History Library, 4016 Carya Drive, Raleigh
Speaker: Craig Scott, President and CEO of Heritage Books
Topic: Research in the National Archives
Guests are welcome — bring a friend!
If you haven’t heard Craig talk before then you are in for a delightful time.  He is a nationally renowned speaker!

Upcoming Seminar with NC Chapter Palatines to America

The North Carolina Chapter of Palatines to America is holding its first Fall Seminar on Saturday, October 1, 2011, at the Wake County Southeast Regional Library in Garner.

Registration information: www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~ncwcgs/palamseminar.pdf

Palatines to America is a genealogical society for those researching German speaking ancestors, with emphasis on migration from the Germanic regions of Europe to North America. For more information, visit their website at www.palam.org.

Free Web Tutorial for New Genealogists

Free Web Tutorial

Family Tree Magazine is offering a free online tutorial to help new genealogists trace their roots. If you are new to genealogy and not sure where to start, then this is the place to be!

When: Sat, Oct 16, 2010 2pm-3pm EDT (1 CDT, 12 MDT, 11 am PDT)
Where: Your computer!

You’ll learn:
• The best places to gather information
• Tips for online searching and genealogy websites
• Records that contain information about your ancestors
• Ways to record and share what you find, including genealogy software

Who should attend:
• People who are completely new to genealogy
• “Armchair researchers” who’ve dabbled a bit with genealogy websites but want more direction
• Intermediate genealogists looking for a refresher on research fundamentals

“Community Dialogue about School Desegration”

Dear Friends,

Don’t miss this upcoming program-”A Community Dialogue about School Desegregation”-part of the North Carolina Collection’s Commemorating Courage series, presented with Duke University’s Pauli Murray Project.

The program will be held this Sunday, August 22, to honor the first African-American students to integrate several of Durham’s previously all white schools and to mark the 50th anniversary of the first of these students to graduate from Durham High School. We invite you to bring your memories of Durham or the places you grew up-to share your stories and learn from the stories of your neighbors.

Thanks for helping to get the word out! I look forward to seeing you on the 22th.

Lynn

Lynn Richardson
North Carolina Collection
Durham County Library
(919) 560-0171

Branson’s North Carolina Business Directory

Branson’s North Carolina Business Directory is currently being digitized and uploaded to the Internet Archives website.

This historical directory is organized alphabetically by county and gives information on the county, names of the towns and post offices, county and town officers and magistrates, churches, ministers, hotels, lawyers, manufacturers, tradesmen, mines, mills, newspapers, merchants, schools, physicians, farmers, teachers, and so on. It also contains a list of railroads and an index to advertisements found throughout the book.

This is a great source for locating your ancestors and learning about what they did for occupations and for getting a good picture of the kinds of things that were happening around town during that time period.

These books are fully searchable and several have already been digitized by UNC and uploaded to the internet archives website. Click here to access a list of available titles ranging from 1867 – 1896.

Marriage Records Survey: Durham County, North Carolina

Copyright © 2010 by Jordan Jones

Originally published at GenealogyMedia.com. Used by permission of the author.
Permalink: http://www.genealogymedia.com/2010/05/30/marriage-durham-co-nc/

I visited the Durham County Register of Deeds, 200 East Main Street, Durham, NC 27701-3649 to survey their marriage records. The office is quite accessible. It is in the middle of downtown Durham, with ample, reasonably priced parking in a parking structure next door. The Register of Deeds is in the basement of the old courthouse, directly across the street from the modern Durham County Government Building.

Access to the records is remarkably open. The records room is located behind the public reception area. One of the clerks lets you in to examine the records on your own. There is good light in the street-level basement where the marriage records are in open filing cabinets. A table, chairs, pencils, and scrap paper are available to researchers.

The records range from 1897 to the present. Because of institutional segregation, African-American and white marriage records are separate from 1897 until 1975. Older records are in plastic sleeves, one to a record. More recent records are in manila pouches, one per month of records.

Although Durham County was established in 1881, and most marriage records are no earlier than December 1898, the earliest marriage record in the office is a marriage certificate dated 27 Feb 1897 but recorded 30 May 1900. The certificate provides the names and ages of the bride and groom (Maggie Williams, 18, and John Mitchel, 22). It also names the father of the bride (Chas. Williams). The parents of the groom are listed as “unknown,” and the mother of the bride as “dead.” This is an African-American record, which may explain some of the gaps in information, as African-American records were not treated with equanimity at the time, and John Mitchel would have been born circa 1875, only ten years after the end of the Civil War.

The office contains only marriage certificates. It does not contain marriage licenses, marriage returns, marriage registers (more on these later), marriage bonds, marriage intentions, or consents for the marriages of minors. (The office also contains other vital records, including original death and birth records. Death certificates are available from 1991 to 2010. Previous records may be out for digitization.) Aside from the gap from 1881-1897, I did not see any gaps in the marriage records. The Family History Library has several reels of microfilmed marriage registers (FHL 812817, FHL 812818, FHL 812819, and FHL 812820, covering the marriage register volumes 1-8 from 1881-1965); the North Carolina State Archives also has these films. The Family History Library also has microfilmed records (FHL 812820) covering marriage licenses from 1898-1905, which are probably the records I was looking at, though they are called marriage certificates on the original documents.

The personnel indicate that there are no known gaps in the records. They did not know where the registers were, but said they might be at the North Carolina State Archives. While the records from 1897-2010 are all available, the index have been temporarily removed for conservation, with a planned return date of the middle of June 2010. Some of the marriage records are stamped as “Filmed by North Carolina Dept. of Archives and History.” There is also a digitization project that is intended to put the death, birth, and marriage records online within the Register of Deeds’ local network.

The records are open to the public. There appear to be no restrictions as to who can view or copy any of the records. Once I found a records I wanted to copy, the clerks directed me to a self-service copier. The copies were a reasonable $0.10 each.

More recent documents, such as the 1975 application, license and certificate of marriage for Lafayette Barnes and Catherine Estes Roberson have more detailed information about the spouses. The records add the birth dates, and not simply the ages of the parties marrying, as well as their birth places, and the birth places of their parents. The forms also include the addresses of the spouses and the addresses of their parents, if they are living and the addresses are known.

Durham County, North Carolina, Marriage Records, unnumbered certificate, 27 Feb 1897, recorded 30 May 1900. John Mitchel to Maggie Williams; Register of Deeds, Durham.

Durham County, North Carolina, Marriage Records, no. 698144, recorded 26 Dec 1975, Lafayette Barnes to Catherine Estes Roberson; Register of Deeds, Durham.