Durham newspaper to be digitized

chronicling america image

 

North Carolina is participating in the National Digital Newspaper Program (NDNP), a partnership between the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) and the Library of Congress (LC) which is endeavoring to digitize historic newspapers across the country in order to make them available online for research.

The Durham Daily Globe will be included in the list of titles to be digitized in 2013.

The Durham Daily Globe started in Durham, North Carolina in 1889 by publisher Edward A. Oldham. It was published daily with an additional Durham Sunday Globe published on Sundays from 1889 to 1894.

It had previously been called The Daily Tobacco Plant (1888-1889) and the Durham Daily Recorder (1886-188?).

Following 1894 the title changed to The Globe-Herald, the Morning Herald, and the Durham Weekly Globe. 

If you can’t wait until 2014 when the digital copies of this newspaper will be posted online to the Library of Congress’ Chronicling America site, you can view the microfilmed copies of this newspaper  at the following locations:

Duke University Library, Durham County Library, East Carolina University, the North Carolina State Archives, the State Library of North Carolina, and UNC-CH.

Stewart Dunaway

Stewart Dunaway

The Durham-Orange Genealogical Society of North Carolina will hold its next Monthly Meeting at the Bennett Place next Wednesday, February 1, 2012 from 7-9 pm. The topic will be The McCulloh Great Tracts – Their Impact on Genealogy Research presented by Stewart Dunaway. All meetings are open to the Public. 

Date: February 1, 2012

Time: 7:00pm-9:00pm

Topic: The McCulloh Great Tracts – Their Impact on Genealogy Research

Speaker: Stewart Dunaway

Location: Bennett Place located at 4409 Bennett Memorial Road, Durham,
NC 27705-2307 – (919) 383-4345 – http://www.nchistoricsites.org/bennett/

*Note*  Stewart will sell and sign books at the end of the meeting.

About the topic: 

The McCulloh Great Tracts – and their impact on
genealogy research

Henry McCulloh was a typical adventurer in the realm of colonial
politics and economics. He is said to have been a merchant of London,
and his home was at Turnham Green, Middlesex County. He probably became
interested in North Carolina through his relations with Gabriel
Johnston, to whom he advanced considerable sums of money between 1726
and 1733.  McCulloh’s deepest interest in the New World was that of a
land speculator. In 1737, the Crown delivered to Murray Crymble and
James Huey, trustees for McCulloh, warrants for 1,200,000 acres in North
Carolina, on condition that 6,000 foreign Protestants should be colonized.

Related information about the topic:
http://piedmontwanderings.blogspot.com/2010/01/settlers-in-tract-11.html
http://piedmontwanderings.blogspot.com/2010/01/great-tract-11-and-haw-river.html
http://www.carolana.com/NC/Royal_Colony/nc_royal_colony_henry_mcculloch.html

About the speaker:

Stewart Dunaway, formerly an executive of Siemens Telecom (FL), is
retired and now spends time researching colonial and revolutionary war
history in North Carolina. He has published myriad historical books as
well as genealogy-related material from the State Archives. He has
transcribed over 19,000 records from the Archives, now provided in book
form. His books can be found on the internet at:
http://www.lulu.com/spotlight/sedunaway.
Stewart, his wife Maryellen, and daughter Sarah reside in Hillsborough.

Parkwood Flea Market October 1, 2011

As many of you may know, October is Family History Month. In celebration of this, The Durham-Orange Genealogical Society will be hosting a table at a neighborhood flea market hosted by a local subdivision that many of us live in – Parkwood of Durham. See the announcement below:

D-OGS will have a table at the Parkwood Flea Market in which we will sell gently used items particularly genealogy books, magazines, software, etc, that our members have donated in addition to back issues of our Trading Path journal. We will also have membership brochures on hand to give out to interested parties. Please talk to Karen Vance if interested in donating or manning the table during this event.

Please join us on Revere Road in Durham, NC 27713  between 7 a.m. and 11 a.m.

(near Highway 54/55 intersection, former Parker Library location)

“Community Dialogue about School Desegration”

Dear Friends,

Don’t miss this upcoming program-“A Community Dialogue about School Desegregation”-part of the North Carolina Collection’s Commemorating Courage series, presented with Duke University’s Pauli Murray Project.

The program will be held this Sunday, August 22, to honor the first African-American students to integrate several of Durham’s previously all white schools and to mark the 50th anniversary of the first of these students to graduate from Durham High School. We invite you to bring your memories of Durham or the places you grew up-to share your stories and learn from the stories of your neighbors.

Thanks for helping to get the word out! I look forward to seeing you on the 22th.

Lynn

Lynn Richardson
North Carolina Collection
Durham County Library
(919) 560-0171

Marriage Records Survey: Durham County, North Carolina

Copyright © 2010 by Jordan Jones

Originally published at GenealogyMedia.com. Used by permission of the author.
Permalink: http://www.genealogymedia.com/2010/05/30/marriage-durham-co-nc/

I visited the Durham County Register of Deeds, 200 East Main Street, Durham, NC 27701-3649 to survey their marriage records. The office is quite accessible. It is in the middle of downtown Durham, with ample, reasonably priced parking in a parking structure next door. The Register of Deeds is in the basement of the old courthouse, directly across the street from the modern Durham County Government Building.

Access to the records is remarkably open. The records room is located behind the public reception area. One of the clerks lets you in to examine the records on your own. There is good light in the street-level basement where the marriage records are in open filing cabinets. A table, chairs, pencils, and scrap paper are available to researchers.

The records range from 1897 to the present. Because of institutional segregation, African-American and white marriage records are separate from 1897 until 1975. Older records are in plastic sleeves, one to a record. More recent records are in manila pouches, one per month of records.

Although Durham County was established in 1881, and most marriage records are no earlier than December 1898, the earliest marriage record in the office is a marriage certificate dated 27 Feb 1897 but recorded 30 May 1900. The certificate provides the names and ages of the bride and groom (Maggie Williams, 18, and John Mitchel, 22). It also names the father of the bride (Chas. Williams). The parents of the groom are listed as “unknown,” and the mother of the bride as “dead.” This is an African-American record, which may explain some of the gaps in information, as African-American records were not treated with equanimity at the time, and John Mitchel would have been born circa 1875, only ten years after the end of the Civil War.

The office contains only marriage certificates. It does not contain marriage licenses, marriage returns, marriage registers (more on these later), marriage bonds, marriage intentions, or consents for the marriages of minors. (The office also contains other vital records, including original death and birth records. Death certificates are available from 1991 to 2010. Previous records may be out for digitization.) Aside from the gap from 1881-1897, I did not see any gaps in the marriage records. The Family History Library has several reels of microfilmed marriage registers (FHL 812817, FHL 812818, FHL 812819, and FHL 812820, covering the marriage register volumes 1-8 from 1881-1965); the North Carolina State Archives also has these films. The Family History Library also has microfilmed records (FHL 812820) covering marriage licenses from 1898-1905, which are probably the records I was looking at, though they are called marriage certificates on the original documents.

The personnel indicate that there are no known gaps in the records. They did not know where the registers were, but said they might be at the North Carolina State Archives. While the records from 1897-2010 are all available, the index have been temporarily removed for conservation, with a planned return date of the middle of June 2010. Some of the marriage records are stamped as “Filmed by North Carolina Dept. of Archives and History.” There is also a digitization project that is intended to put the death, birth, and marriage records online within the Register of Deeds’ local network.

The records are open to the public. There appear to be no restrictions as to who can view or copy any of the records. Once I found a records I wanted to copy, the clerks directed me to a self-service copier. The copies were a reasonable $0.10 each.

More recent documents, such as the 1975 application, license and certificate of marriage for Lafayette Barnes and Catherine Estes Roberson have more detailed information about the spouses. The records add the birth dates, and not simply the ages of the parties marrying, as well as their birth places, and the birth places of their parents. The forms also include the addresses of the spouses and the addresses of their parents, if they are living and the addresses are known.

Durham County, North Carolina, Marriage Records, unnumbered certificate, 27 Feb 1897, recorded 30 May 1900. John Mitchel to Maggie Williams; Register of Deeds, Durham.

Durham County, North Carolina, Marriage Records, no. 698144, recorded 26 Dec 1975, Lafayette Barnes to Catherine Estes Roberson; Register of Deeds, Durham.

Annual Durham Neighborhoods Hike is Saturday, April 10th

Join the Sierra Club and Get Up & Go Durham on April 10th, 2010 at 9:00 AM for our annual neighborhood hike through East Campus, West Durham & beyond. This walking tour will be narrated by our local history lover John Schelp.

Saturday, April 10 at 9:00 AM
Meet at Markham & Buchanan

Was Duke Chapel really going to be built in Walltown? What Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist went to EK Powe school? What song writer for Nora Jones and Lou Rawls was “born on a kitchen table” behind Magnolia Grill? Why is Ninth Street called Ninth Street? Where did Madonna take early dance lessons?

Come along and find out…

1920 Street Map: Trinity College is shown on the right while the Erwin Cotton Mill is on the left (where the three railroad spurs extend north into the mills). The West Durham mill village is north, west and south of the mills. Walltown and Trinity Heights are north of the college while Trinity Park lies to the east. Courtesy of Durham County Library.

The 4-mile loop starts at Markham & Buchanan (at the old City limits).

We’ll start by walking past the homes of Duke’s famous faculty and coaches on Buchanan, including the father of Duke basketball. We’ll go down Watts Street, past Trinity Park park, and then walk across East Campus to Ninth Street.

We’ll stroll up Ninth, past EK Powe, and see the South Ellerbe Creek Nature Area. We’ll walk through an old mill village, see some old liquor houses and a parsonage that was ordered from the Sears catalogue. We’ll continue up Oakland, past Oval Park, and Indian Trail Park in the Watts-Hillandale neighborhood.

We’ll head east along the West Ellerbe Trail in the 17-acre wood, then walk past the old Watts Hospital and cross Club Blvd (near 9th Street). We’ll go down a hidden alley, head over to Walltown and hear about Duke’s original plans to build here. Then through Trinity Heights and back to where we began.

You’ll see a little nature and learn some Durham history along the way. We might even get into current events in the Bull City.

Local history lover John Schelp will narrate along the way. You don’t have to register. Parking is available on streets near Markham and Buchanan.

2008 Walking tour. Image courtesy of Ildar Sagdejev

Co-sponsored by the Sierra Club and Get Up & Go Durham.

Please visit the History of Old West Durham website for more information.