Gazetteer

The following list is a compilation of my own information and items found in other sources. I am still checking Powell’s descriptions against my atlas; I have found some errors that may have been corrected in later editions. The list of post offices came from another site.

Please keep in mind, if you are trying to find a land feature that is named in a deed or other document dated from 1771 to 1785, that it may be in “Old Guilford County” and not the present-day Guilford County. The southern third of Old Guilford became Randolph County in 1779, and the northern third of Old Guilford became Rockingham County in 1785. I don’t want to compile a gazetteer that covers all three counties in detail, but I may include some land features which occur regularly in early deeds and documents of Old Guilford County.

You may submit further names or information — for example, the GPS coordinates or a small map of the location. Please remember to include any relevant source citations.

You may also want to check these sites:


Alamance – (1) the name of the county just to the east of Guilford, which was created from Orange County in 1849. The eastern third of Guilford came from Orange County when it was created in 1771. The area draws its name from Great [Big] Alamance Creek.  (2) a post office in central Rock Creek Township.

Alamance Creek – Great [Big] Alamance Creek “is formed by the junction of Little Alamance and Big Alamance creeks in east Guilford County and flows east across Alamance County where it enters Haw River. Appears as Aramancy River on the Moseley map, 1733. Called Aramanchy River by William Byrd, 1728.” The North Carolina Gazetteer: A Dictionary of Tar Heel Places, by William S. Powell, UNC Press, 1968, p. 200.

Battle Ground or Battleground – (1) “former community in central Guilford County, now within the limits of the city of Greensboro. Site of Battle of Guilford Courthouse, March 15, 1781.” Powell, p. 26.
(2) a post office from 1858 to 1923.

Beal’s Branch – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising SW of Guilford Courthouse, near Beal’s 1755 sawmill, and flowing SE into North Buffalo Creek. Not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Beaver Creek – “rises in east Guilford County and flows east into Alamance County where it enters Great [Big] Alamance Creek.” [My edition says "west Guilford County and flows west into Alamance...", but that is impossible, as Alamance is east of Guilford, and my atlas shows the creek in east Guilford; this must be a double typo.] Powell, p. 32.

Beaverdam Creek – shown on the Fred Hughes map, rising in east central Guilford County and flowing NE into the North Fork of Alamance Creek.

Bell’s Muster Ground – on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers; appears near the headwaters of Sugar Tree Creek, to the ESE of Guilford Courthouse.

Benaja Creek – “rises in northeast Guilford County and flows northeast into Rockingham County where it enters Haw River. Original name was Benajar. Believed to have been named for the tropical ben tree plus ajar in the sense of ‘out of place.’ ” Powell, p. 39.

Bessemer – a neighborhood in northeast Greensboro, east of US 220 and near US 70; this name is not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer, but it is known to Greensboro residents; the name is used by a local elementary school.

Birch [or Burch] Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising in southern Guilford County and flowing NE into North Fork Alamance Creek. Not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Bloomimton (Bloomington?) – a post office from 1858 to 1865.

Boulding Branch – rises in southwest Guilford County, in High Point, and runs northeast into the Deep River system.

Brick Church – (1) “community in southeast Guilford County. First German Calvinist (German Reformed) church in Guilford County.” Powell, p. 62.  (2) a post office from 1854 to 1905; located in northern Greene Township.

Browns Summit – (1) “community in north Guilford County. Alt. 805. Land here acquired by Jesse Brown, 1858. Named for him in 1863 when Richmond and Danville Railroad was built, because the Brown farm was the highest point on the line.” Powell, p. 66.
(2) a post office from 1871 to the present; located in northeast Monroe Township.

Bruce’s Crossroads ~ see Summerfield

Bruce Township – “northwest Guilford County; named for Charles Bruce, early settler, Revolutionary soldier and founder of Bruce’s Crossroad, now Summerfield.” Powell, p. 66.” (see the map near the top of this page).

Brush Creek – “rises in west Guilford County and flows northeast into Reedy Fork Creek.” Powell, p. 67.

Buffalo Creek – “formed by the junction of North Buffalo Creek and South Buffalo Creek in northeast Guilford County. It flows northeast into Reedy Fork Creek. Named after 1755 but before 1758.” Powell, p. 72.

Bull Run Creek – “rises in south Guilford County and flows southwest into East Prong Deep River.” Powell, p. 74.

Burch [or Birch] Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising in southern Guilford County and flowing NE into North Fork Alamance Creek. Not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Busick – (1) “community in northeast Guilford County. Alt. approx. 850.” Powell, p. 77.   (2) a post office from 1876 to 1888.

Calhoun – a post office from 1836 to 1839.

Candy Creek – “rises in northeast Guilford County and flows north into Rockingham County where it enters Haw River. Known as Kanady’s Branch and as Kanady Creek prior to 1800, named for an early settler.” Powell, p. 85.

Cascade – a post office from 1892 to 1903.

Center Grove Township – see the Township Map.

Centre – (1) “community in south Guilford County. Named for Centre Friends Meeting, begun in 1757.” Powell, p. 98.   (2) a post office from 1819 to 1903; located in southern Sumner Township.

Chocolate Creek – “rises in southeast Guilford County and flows northeast into Stinking Quarter Creek.” Powell, p. 106.

Clapps – a post office from 1829 to 1854.

Clay Township – see the map near the top of this page.

Climax – (1) “community in southeast Guilford County. Alt. 824. Est. 1853. Named for its location on high ground.” Powell, p. 110.  (2) a post office from 1891 to the present; located in southern Fentress Township.

Colfax – (1) “community in west Guilford County. Alt. 972. Named for Schuyler Colfax (1823-85), vice president of the United States (1869-73).” Powell, p. 114.  (2) a post office from 1870 to 1875, and from 1879 to the present; located in central Deep River Township.

Company Mills – a post office from 1873 to 1903; located in eastern Madison Township.

Crystal – a post office from 1880 to 1903.

Danamora – a post office from 1892 to 1903.

Danville – a post office from 1891 to 1904; located in northeast Clay Township.

Deep River – (1) “is formed in southwest Guilford County at High Point Lake by the junction of East Fork Deep River and West Fork Deep River. It flows southeast through Randolph County, across the northeast edge of Moore County, and forms a part of the Chatham-Lee County line. It joins Haw River in southeast Chatham County to form Cape Fear River. The junction of Haw and Deep rivers was one of six sites suggested in 1788 for the location of the state capital.” Powell, p. 138.  (2) a township in west Guilford County.  (3) a post office from 1828 to 1903.

Dennysville – a post office from 1888 to 1905; located in southern Rock Creek Township.

Dick’s Ferry – mentioned in 1782 deed.

Dicks Store – a post office from 1819 to 1819.

Dobbin – a post office from 1853 to 1854.

East Fork Deep River – “rises in west Guilford County and flows southeast into High Point Lake where it joins West Fork Deep River to form Deep River.” Powell, p. 155.

Ella – a post office from 1899 to 1903.

Eulis – a post office from 1900 to 1907.

Fentress / Fentriss – (1) “Fentress Township, south central Guilford County. Named for Frederick Fentriss.” Powell, p. 170.  (2) see Pleasant Garden.  (3) a post office from 1841 to 1876.

Fern – a post office from 1901 to 1907.

Fish Creek – “rises in east Guilford County and flows northeast across the northwest corner of Alamance County into Caswell County where it enters Buttermilk Creek.” Powell, p. 171.

Fishing Creek – a post office from 1813 to 1819.

Frazier’s Fork – “SW side of Deep R. on Frazier’s Fork, part of a larger tract from Granville to Frazier 30 July 1760…” mentioned in 1771 deed from Aaron Frazier & Sarah his wife to Robert Green….”
“in Parish of St. Luke … on Frazier’s Fork” mentioned in 1772 deed from Nathaniel Kerr to Edward Sharp.

Freemans Mills – a post office from 1870 to 1904; located in southern Jamestown Township.

Friendship – (1) “community in west Guilford County, est. 1833. Alt. 893. Named for a Friends (Quaker) meeting house. Powell, p. 183.  (2) Friendship Township, west central Guilford County.” Powell, p. 183.  (3) a post office from 1830 to 1933; located in central Friendship Township.

Gerins Store – a post office from 1828 to 1835.

Gibsonville – (1) “town in east Guilford and west Alamance counties. Alt. 728. Est. 1855 and inc. 1871. Named for Joseph Gibson (1785-1857), local land and slave owner who also was active in contracting and grading for the North Carolina Railroad. A station est. about a mile north of his home was named for him and became the town. Produces textiles, apparel, and hosiery.” Powell, p. 190.  (2) a post office from 1855 to the present; located in eastern Rock Creek Township.

Gilher’s (Gilmer’s?) Store – a post office from 1850 to 1903.

Gilmer Township – in central Guilford County; see the Township Map.

Glenwood – (1) “former community in central Guilford County now within Greensboro city limits.” Powell, p. 192.  (2) a post office from 1909 to 1935.

Greene Township – in southeast Guilford County; named for General Nathanael Greene; see the Township Map.

Greensboro / Greensborough —  (1) “city and county seat, central Guilford County. Alt. 838. Est. 1808 and inc. 1810. Named for General Nathanael Greene (1742-86), American leader at nearby Battle of Guilford Courthouse, 1781. Produces textiles, hosiery, apparel, fabricated metals, paper boxes, dairy products, tobacco, chemicals, electronics, and baked goods. The University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Bennett College for Women, Greensboro College, Guilford College, and North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University are located here.” Powell, pp. 203-04.  (2) a post office from 1810 to the present, using the variation Greensborough from 1853 to 1893, and then reverting back to Greensboro for its spelling.

Groometown – “community in south Guilford County. Named for local family.” Powell, p. 206.

Guilford – (1) “was formed in 1771 from Rowan and Orange counties. Located in the n central section of the state, it is bounded by Alamance, Randolph, Davidson, Forsyth, and Rockingham counties. It was named for Francis North, first Earl of Guilford (1704-90), member of Parliament and intimate personal friend of George III and Queen Charlotte. Area: 652 sq. mi. County seat: Greensboro with an elevation of 838 ft. Townships are Bruce, Center Grove, Deep River, Fentress, Friendship, Gilmer, Greene, High Point, Jamestown, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe, Morehead, Oak Ridge, Rock Creek, Sumner, and Washington. Produces tobacco, corn, wheat, oats, poultry, eggs, dairy products, livestock, hogs, textiles, hosiery, apparel, paper boxes, baked goods, cigarettes, toys, lumber, chemicals, and corrugated boxes.” Powell, p. 206.  (2) “community in west central Guilford County. Named for the county.” Powell, p. 206.  (3) a post office from 1888 to 1962.

Guilford College – (1) “town in west central Guilford County. Quaker settlement founded 1750 and known as New Garden. Boarding school opened 1837; renamed Guilford College in 1889 at which time the community name also was changed. Chartered 1895. The college is now within the limits of the city of Greensboro. Alt. 939.” Powell, p. 206.  (2) a post office from 1889 to 1957; located in eastern Friendship Township.

Guilford Courthouse – “former county seat, central Guilford County. Est. 1774; chartered as Martinville, 1785; abandoned 1808. Battle here on March 15, 1781, between American General Nathanael Greene and British General Lord Charles Cornwallis; site now a National Military Park.” Powell, p. 206.

Haw River – “rises in northeast Forsyth County and flows northeast and southeast through Guilford and Rockingham counties and across Alamance and Chatham counties to join Deep River on the Chatham-Lee County line to form Cape Fear River. It is approx. 130 mi. in length. In 1709 John Lawson called this the Hau River and said that it was named for the Sissipahau Indians who lived along its banks. Appears as Saxapahaw River on the Moseley map, 1733, but by its present name on the Collet map, 1770. The junction of Deep and Haw rivers was one of six sites suggested in 1788 for the location of the state capital.” Powell, p. 218.

Hickory Creek – “rises in south Guilford County and flows south into Deep River. Appears on the Collet map, 1770.” Powell, p. 224.

High Point – (1) “city in southwest Guilford County. Alt. 940. Laid out in 1853 and inc. 1859. Named for the fact that it was the highest point on the North Carolina Railroad. Produces textiles, hosiery, furniture, baked goods, apparel, corrugated boxes, fabricated metals, toys, lumber, and chemicals. An important furniture market is operated here. Home of High Point College. See also Browntown.” Powell, p. 227.  (2) “township in southwest Guilford County, named for the town.” Powell, p. 227.  (3) a post office from 1854 to the present.

High Point Lake – “in southwest Guilford County is formed at the junction of East Fork Deep River and West Fork Deep River where Deep River is formed. The lake was created by a dam constructed in 1928 and is named for and owned by the city of High Point. Max. depth 20 ft.; area, 150 acres.” Powell, p. 227.

Hillsborough District – “Hillsborough District,” mentioned in early census or court records, was not part of Guilford County. Instead, certain counties were a part of the Hillsborough District. In 1755 NC created five District Superior Courts throughout the state. If you see the name “Hillsborough District,” that area was in the Superior Court District for Hillsborough, which is in Orange County. A third of Guilford County came from Orange County in 1771. The Salisbury District included the counties which are now Anson, Cabarrus, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Guilford, Iredell, Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Randolph, Richmond, Rockingham, Rowan, Stanly, Stokes, Surry, Union, and Yadkin. The District Superior Courts were discontinued in 1806 when individual counties were allowed to have Superior Courts.

Hillsdale —  (1) “community in north Guilford County.” Powell, p. 228.  (2) a post office from 1835 to 1902; located in central Center Grove Township.

Hinton – a post office from 1880 to 1903.

Hogans Creek – mentioned in deeds from 1779 to 1783.

Holt – a post office from 1887 to 1903; located in northern Friendship Township.

Horsepen Creek – “rises in west Guilford County and flows northeast into Reedy Fork Creek.” Powell, p. 236.

Hunts Store – a post office from 1825 to 1858.

Jack Grove – a post office from 1861 to 1866.

Jamestown – (1) “town in southwest Guilford County. Est. 1770 and named for James Mendenhall, an early settler whose first name was chosen in the Quaker fashion to avoid ostentation. Inc. 1881; charter repealed 1893; rechartered 1947. Produces corrugated boxes and textiles. Alt. 779. Powell, p. 251.
(2) township in southwest Guilford County.  (3) a post office from 1811 to today; located in central Jamestown Township.

Jefferson Township – in east central Guilford; see Township Map.

Julian – (1) “community in south Guilford and north Randolph counties. Alt. 772.” Powell, p. 259.
(2) a post office from 1885 to the present; located in southern Clay Township.

Katie Branch – rises in northeast Guilford County and flows southeast into Haw River [not in Powell's Gazetteer but on NC atlas].

Kimesville – “community in west Alamance and east Guilford counties. Settled about 1745; a mill here dates from about 1788. Named for pioneer German family in the area, Keim or Kime.” Powell, p. 264.
(2) a post office in eastern Greene Township.

Kings Crossroads – a community in northwest Guilford County.

Kirkman Crossroads – a community in southwest Guilford County.

Lacrosse – a post office from 1891 to 1904; located in northern Greene Township.

Lake Brandt – “an artificial lake in central Guilford County on Reedy Fork Creek. Maximum depth 25 ft. 400 acres. Formed in 1920 and named for former Greensboro mayor Leon J. Brandt (1874-1920). Municipal water supply for Greensboro and owned by the city.” Powell, p. 268.

Lambeth – (see Monticello)

Lamont – a post office from 1886 to 1907; located in northern Clay Township.

Lego – a post office from 1893 to 1906.

Liberty Hill – “former community in central Guilford County, now a part of Greensboro.” Powell, p. 280.

Liberty Store – a post office from 1877 to 1903; located in northern Washington Township.

Little Hickory Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers as rising in south Guilford and flowing SSW into Deep River just before the Randolph County line. It is to the SE of Hickory Creek and enters Deep River separately from Hickory Creek.

Long Branch – “rises in north Guilford County and flows southwest [southeast, actually] into East Fork Deep River.” Powell, p. 296.

Longview – a post office from 1891 to 1902.

Mabins Store – a post office from 1826 to 1829.

Madison Township – “northeast Guilford County. Named for President James Madison and his wife Dolley Payne, said to have been born at the Quaker settlement of New Garden, now Guilford College.” Powell, p. 309.

Mars – a post office from 1828 to 1831.

Martinville – (1) “former town and county seat, central Guilford County, est. 1774 as Guilford Courthouse and chartered as Martinville, 1785. Named for Governor Alexander Martin (1740-1807). Abandoned 1808 with the establishment of Greensboro as county seat.” Powell, pp. 314-15.
(2) a post office from 1792 to 1834; located in extreme northern Morehead Township.

McCulloch/McCulloh Tract/Line – “In 1737, Henry McCulloh was granted twelve tracts of 100,000 acres each. 42,000 acres of Tract #11 fell in present day Guilford. Granville, the only one of eight Lords Proprietors to retain Carolina land, was granted the same land, plus everything else. All land ownerships originated with these two land holders until after the Revolution. After that, the source of new land was the state, which had confiscated all ungranted land and land that had been owned by active Tories.” Fred Hughes in “Guilford County: A Map Supplement” — see Land Record Information

McLeansville – (1) “community in east Guilford County. Named for a pioneer family of Ulster Scots who settled in this area.” Powell, p. 308.  (2) a post office from 1856 to today; located in northern Jefferson Township.

Mears Fork Creek – “rises in northeast Guilford County and flows northeast into Haw River near the Rockingham County line.” Powell, p. 318.

Mebane Mill Branch – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising in central Guilford and flowing SE into Birch Creek near location of William Mebane’s 1759 land grant. Not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Mechanicsville – the old name for the section of High Point surrounding the intersection of North Main Street and Lexington Avenue.

Mile Branch – rises in southwest Guilford County and runs into Deep Creek, just NW of exit 113 from I-85; shown on the modern DeLorme atlas of NC.

Mile Run Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, and on the modern DeLorme atlas of NC; rises in central Guilford County, in south central Greensboro, and runs southeast into South Buffalo Creek.

Mojoson – a community in northwest Guilford County.

Monroe Township – in north central Guilford; see the Township Map.

Monticello – (1) “community in north Guilford County. Named for Thomas Jefferson’s home near Charlottesville, Virginia. Formerly known as Lambeth for a boarding academy operated here by one Reverend Mr. Lambeth.” Powell, p. 332.  (2) a post office from 1846 to 1881.

Moores Creek – “rises in west Guilford County and flows northeast into Reedy Fork Creek.” Powell, p. 333.

Morehead Township – “central Guilford County. Named for Governor John Motley Morehead (1796-1866) of Greensboro. Covers most of the western half of Greensboro.” Powell, p. 334.  (see Township Map)

Muddy Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising in east central Guilford and flowing NE into North Buffalo Creek. Not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Nelson’s Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising in south central Guilford and flowing north into South Buffalo Creek. Not in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Nix’s Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising to the SE of Guilford Courthouse, and flowing south and then southeast into North Buffalo Creek, near the 1753 land grant to John Nix (also spelled Nicks). Not shown in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Oakdale – a community in southwest Guilford County.

Oak Ridge – (1) “town in northwest Guilford County. Alt. 885. Est. in 1852 and inc. in 1897. Named for its location on an oak-grown ridge. Oak Ridge Military Institute, oldest military preparatory school in North Carolina, founded here in 1854. Powell, p. 360.  (2) township in northwest Guilford County. Powell, p. 360.  (3) a post office from 1828 – 1868, and 1871 to the present.

Osceola – “a crossroads community in northeast Guilford County.” Powell, p. 366.

Paisley’s Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising in eastern Guilford County and flowing SE into North Fork of Alamance Creek. Not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Parish of St. Luke – mentioned in 1772 deed from Nathaniel Kerr to Edward Sharp; should be somewhere in the area of Deep River.

Parsons Mills – a post office from 1840 to 1852.

Plain – a post office from 1879 to 1903.

Plank Road – any one of a group of toll roads that were built during the 1800′s to help with transportation needs. The Fayetteville and Western segment ran through the southwest corner of Guilford on its way to its terminal in Salem (Winston-Salem in Forsyth County). The Plank Road was eclipsed by the growing railroad system. The second of these articles has a map linked to it.
North Carolina History Project – Plank Roads

Pleasant Garden – (1) “community in south Guilford County. Alt. 805. Known first as Fentress for local family; renamed Pleasant Garden about 1879.” Powell, p. 388.  (2) a post office from 1876 to the present; located in central Fentress Township.

Polecat Creek – “rises in south Guilford County and flows southeast into Randolph County where it enters Deep River. The name appears in local records as early as 1762.” Powell, p. 390.

Pomona – (1) “former community in central Guilford County now within Greensboro city limits. Alt. 868. Named for the Italian goddess of the fruit of trees; a nursery was once located here. Clay pipe and electrical goods are produced here.” Powell, p. 391.  (2) a post office from 1886 to 1954; located in central Morehead Township.

Pond – a post office from 1879 to 1887.

Poplar Branch – “rises in central Guilford County and flows northeast into Reedy Fork Creek. Appears on the Collet map, 1770.” Powell, p. 392.

Proximity – “formerly a cotton mill community in central Guilford County, now a part of Greensboro. Camp for Overseas Replacement Depot located here during World War II.” Powell, p. 397.

Quaker Creek – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, as rising in southeast Guilford County, near the line between Old Rowan and Old Orange, running NE into Alamance Creek. Not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Quaker Fork – “Quaker Fork waters of Allamance” mentioned in 1772 deed from Jane Field of Guilford to John Hawkins of Orange; not in Powell’s gazetteer or on current maps. This may be the Quaker Creek shown just above.

Ramsboro – a post office from 1827 to 1846.

Rathbone – a post office from 1892 to 1903.

Red Cross – a post office from 1875 – 1891.

Reedy Fork – (1) “rises in east Forsyth County and flows east into west Guilford County, northeast across Guilford County, northeast across Guilford County and into northwest Alamance Country where it enters Haw River. Mentioned in local records as early as 1755.” Powell, p. 408.  (2) name of a post office from 1831 to 1888.

Registers Creek – “rises in south Guilford County and flows southeast into Hickory Creek.” Powell, p. 409.

Revolution – (1) “former community in central Guilford County. Est. 1899. Named because the textile plant est. here was expected to revolutionize the cotton manufacturing industry. Now within Greensboro city limits.” Powell, p. 410.  (2) a post office from 1900 to 1901.

Richland Creek – “rises in north central Guilford County and flows northeast into Reedy Fork Creek. Appears on the Collet map, 1770.” Powell, p. 412.

Richland Lake – “central Guilford County, formed by dam on Richland Creek. Built in 1943 by Cone Mills and used for industrial and municipal purposes.” Powell, p. 412.

Ridge – a post office from 1899 to 1903.

Rock Creek – “rises in east Guilford County and flows south into Alamance Creek.” Powell, p. 420.

Rock Creek Township – in east Guilford County; see Township Map.

Rocky Branch – “rises in northwest [actually, northeast] Guilford County and flows southeast into Haw River.” Powell, p. 421.

Rose Creek – rises in northeast Guilford County and flows north into Rockingham County where it enters Haw River [not in Powell's Gazetteer, but on NC atlas].

Rudd – (1) “community in north Guilford County. Alt. 826. Est. 1898 as Sippanaw; later named Morehead. Because of a delay in shipment of merchandise consigned to Morehead City, railroad officials renamed the community to avoid confusion and to honor Seneca and Cicero Rudd, local residents.” Powell, p. 429.  (2) a post office from 1902 to 1907.

Russell’s Run – is shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, as rising in south central Guilford and running ENE into South Buffalo Creek. Hughes’ map shows a nearby state land grant for James Russell dated 1752 (would be in Anson County records), and that is probably the source of the name. This name is not listed in Powell’s Gazetteer.

St. Luke’s Parish – “Church of England, Rowan County, est. 1753 with the formation of the county and coextensive with it. In 1767 the parish had 3,000 white taxables. Dobbs Parish, organized by the Moravians in the Wachovia settlement, was created from St. Luke’s Parish in 1755. St. Luke’s Parish of the Episcopal Church still functions in Salisbury.” Powell, p. 433.

Salem Junction – a post office from 1883 to 1886.

Salisbury District – “Salisbury District,” mentioned in early census or court records, was not part of Guilford County. Instead, counties were a part of the Salisbury District. In 1755 NC created five District Superior Courts throughout the state. The Salisbury District included the counties which are now Anson, Cabarrus, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Guilford, Iredell, Mecklenburg, Montgomery, Randolph, Richmond, Rockingham, Rowan, Stanly, Stokes, Surry, Union, and Yadkin. If you see the name “Hillsborough District,” then that area was in the Superior Court District for Hillsborough, which is in Orange County. A third of Guilford County came from Orange County in 1771. The District Superior Courts were discontinued in 1806 when individual counties were allowed to have Superior Courts.

Sanders or Stafford – a post office in southern Oak Ridge Township; shown on the 1895 map of Guilford by D.W.C. Benbow.

Sandy Branch – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford County settlers as rising in central Guilford County, to the NW of Russell’s Run, close to the location of Sandy Springs Quaker Meeting, and running NE into South Buffalo Creek. It is not in Powell’s Gazetteer.

Sandy Creek – (mentioned on early Guilford deeds, before Randolph County was created in 1779, and prominent in area history) – “community in northeast Randolph County. Sandy Creek Baptist Church here founded, 1755. Here, in 1766, the first attempt was made to organize the Regulators.” Powell, p. 438.

Sandy Ridge – a community in west central Guilford County.

Sawpit Branch – shown on Fred Hughes’ map of early Guilford settlers, rising in central Guilford and running SE into North Buffalo Creek, to the SW of Beal’s Branch, and going by Dillon’s Mill (1787).

Scalesville — (1) “community in north Guilford County. Named for the Scales family of Guilford and Rockingham counties.” Powell, p. 442. — (2) a post office from 1882 to 1902; located in northern Center Grove Township.

Sedalia — (1) “community in east Guilford County. The Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Institute, a junior college and high school for [African-Americans], est. 1901, is here.” Powell, p. 445. — (2) a post office from 1901 to today.

Sedgefield — “resort community in west central Guilford County in a 3,600-acre woodland park. Contains an English-style inn, tennis courts, golf course, and riding stables. Opened 1927.” Powell, p. 445.

Shaw’s Mills – a post office from 1830 to 1903.

Shepperd — a post office from 1831 to 1831.

Smith Branch – rises in northeast Guilford County and flows south into Reedy Fork [not in Powell's Gazetteer, but on NC atlas].

Sparrow — a post office from 1901 to 1902.

Squirrel Branch – “rises in north Guilford County and flows east into Reedy Fork Creek.” Powell, p. 471.

Stafford or Sanders – a post office in southern Oak Ridge Township; shown on the 1895 map of Guilford by D.W.C. Benbow.

Stewarts Mills – a post office from 1828 to 1834.

Stinking Quarter Creek – “rises in south Guilford County and flows northeast into Alamance County where it enters Great [Big] Alamance Creek. Appears on the Collet map, 1770. Name said to have been derived from the fact that Indians cleaned animals here and left quarters of meat to spoil. Caruthers, writing in 1856, said it was formerly known as Stauken’s Quarter Creek, presumably, therefore, name for a grant of land to a pioneer settler.” Powell, p. 476.

Stokesdale — (1) “town in northwest Guilford County. Alt. 950. Inc. 1907. Known earlier as Pine; renamed probably for Governor Montford Stokes (1762-1842).” Powell, p. 476. — (2) a post office from 1887 to the present; located in northern Oak Ridge Township.

Sugar Tree Creek – “Sugar Tree Cr. waters of North Buffaloe” mentioned in 1778 deed from North Carolina to John Burney; not in Powell’s gazetteer.

Summerfield — (1) “community in north Guilford County. Alt. 881. Settled about 1769 by Charles Bruce, later Revolutionary patriot, and known as Bruce’s Crossroads until 1812 when a post office was est. and the community renamed in honor of the evangelist, John Summerfield (1798-1825). Site of Revolutionary skirmish between Lee and Tarleton; campsite of British army under General Charles O’Hara of the Coldstream Guards, February 12, 1781.” Powell, p. 481. — (2) a township in northwest Guilford County. — (3) a post office from 1812 to the present; located in Summerfield Township.

Summers Mills — a post office from 1853 to 1859.

Sumner — (1) a township in “south central Guilford County. Named for General Jethro Sumner (1733-85).” Powell, p. 482. — (2) a post office from 1882 to 1903; located in east central Sumner Township.

Superior — a post office from 1881 to 1881.

Synew Garden — a post office from 1814 to 1889.

Tabernacle — (1) “community in southeast Guilford County.” Powell, p. 486. — (2) a post office from 1880 to 1903; located in western central Clay Township.

Thompsons Store — a post office from 1831 to 1851.

Thoms Mill — a post office from 1879 to 1888.

Tickle Creek — “rises in east Guilford County and flows southeast into Alamance County where it enters Traverse Creek.” Powell, p. 493.

Trading Path or Road — “a colonial trading route dating from the seventeenth century from Petersburg, Va., to the Catawba and Waxhaw Indians. One branch entered North Carolina in Granville County and another in Warren County. They converged near the present site of Oxford and followed a southwest route through Granville, Durham, Orange, Alamance, Guilford, Randolph, Davidson, Rowan and Cabarrus counties. At about the present site of Concord the road split with a west branch leading through present Charlotte to the Catawba Indians. The Trading Path appears on the Collet map, 1770, and the Mouzon map, 1775. It is traced on a modern map in the North Carolina Historical Review, VIII, 404.” Powell, p. 498.

Traverse (Travis) Creek — “rises in east Guilford County and flows northeast into Alamance County where it enters Haw River.” This creek appears under the name of Travis on the NC atlas, but Powell has it listed as Traverse. Powell, p. 499.

Trine Mills — a post office from 1852 to 1855.

Troublesome Creek – “rises in north Guilford County and flows northeast into Rockingham County where it enters Haw River. Sometimes also known as Big Troublesome Creek.” Powell, p. 500.

Vandalia — (1) “former community in south Guilford County, now within the Greensboro city limits.” Powell, p. 511. — (2) a post office from 1884 to 1908.

Washington Township — see the Township Map.

Weatherley’s — a post office from 1821 to 1824.

West Fork Deep River – “rises in west central Guilford County and flows southeast into High Point Lake where it joins East Fork Deep River.” Powell, p. 526.

Westminster — a post office from 1843 to 1904; located in extreme northeastern High Point Township.

Whitsett — (1) “community in east Guilford County. Est. 1884. Named for Whitsett Institute, successor of Fairview Academy, of which W. T. Whitsett was principal in 1888.” Powell, p. 532. — (2) a post office from 1895 to the present.

Young’s Mills — a post office from 1861 to 1878.