Onslow County Confederate Soldier Burials

nc_csaburialsThe NCGenWeb has a new database online – the result of a project of the North Carolina Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans. You can read more background about the database on the NCGenWeb blog.

For those with Onslow county research interests, you may be interested in the list of burials from Onslow county specifically here.   Happy hunting!

 

Right White – Request for Pension

I, Right WHITE age 51 years old; and was Born in january 1846, and used to belonged to Ned WHITE whom died in March in 1866 & Therefore was a slave and oftern hearing that there had been a Provision made to give all of the old slave darkies a Pension when in the sent for and his name to be placed on the books of record to meet the benefit of said law or ? is the ? be may be.   — yours respectfully,

Right WHITE
P.o. Tar Landing
Onslow Co, NC

Source:  Correspondence and Case Files of the Bureau of Pensions Pertaining to the Ex-Slave Pension Movement, 1892-1922. Microfilm M2110, 1 roll. Records of the Veterans Administration, Record Group 15. National Archives and Records Administration, Washington, D.C. — Contributed by Taneya Koonce 5 Feb 2012.

Marine Base Homes – Documents from Camp Lejune

Thanks to a multi-year effort of several collaborators and the permission of the United States Marine Corps, a new website is available for reviewing primary documentation for the many families displaced by the building of Camp Lejune.

Titled MarineBase Homes – the site is a large virtual gallery of documents & photos of records related to the 1941 purchases.  This is an incredible resource everyone! I just can’t say it strongly enough!

photo highlights of the Lee Foy Family property

The documents are organized by 15 geographical areas.  The areas and their land owners were published in the 1983 publication by the Onslow County Genealogical Society, The Heritage of Onslow County. I have started to place the maps and owner lists online and in the next few weeks will link each one to their documentation as I’m able to.  So… check back for updates!

The Former Landowners of Camp Lejune are to be congratulated for this massive undertaking.

African American Soldiers & Sailors

Contributor Richard Phillips continues to create resources for military information in Onslow County.  His most recent work is the site African American Soldiers & Sailors.

The purpose of the site is to share information about African Americans who joined the Army & Navy during the Civil War.  Richard has several sections to the site:

  • information about a monument in Hertford in memory of these soldiers
  • scholarly articles on the topic
  • information on battles
  • links to the wonderful graphs he’s created documenting slaveholders in the county; he’s also contributed the graphs to this site
  • unit rosters

This link has been added to both the African-American page and the Military page on the site.  As a blog-powered site you have the ability to get the new posts sent directly to your feed reader via the RSS feed, or you can regularly visit.   Spend some time exploring it!

Blog for Confederate Soldiers Information

Looking for information on Confederate soldiers of Onslow County?  Richard Phillips has a site that just may be of help: Onslow County Confederate Soldiers.

Just begun in October 2010, Richard is collecting and sharing any information he can find about these individuals.  The site is operated as a blog, so in addition to visiting the site to check for new information you can also subscribe to the RSS feed using your favorite RSS reader.   Don’t know what an RSS feed is? Check the NC Genealogy 2.0 page for more information.   The link to Richard’s site has been added to the Military page on this site.

Life Before Camp LeJeune – Part II

Back in December I uploaded files from researcher Jane Hoveland regarding some of the history of the families who lived in the Camp LeJeune area when the military came to the county.   Part II of those files have now been posted on the Military page.

This information is rich with family history details, so take a look!  Another thanks to Jane for sharing this information with us all.