BLACK, (Rev.) Duncan B. (1893)

(contributed by Herb Williams)

North Carolina Presbyterian, Wilmington NC Thursday August 24, 1893 

REV. DUNCAN B. BLACK 

It is with feelings of tender sorrow that we record the death of this venerable servant of GOD. For nearly fifty years he has preached and lived the gospel of the SON of GOD in the group of churches that he was still serving when the fatal illness came on him that on Sunday last ended his earthly career. In all this time he has shed round about upon three and four generations of parishioners an influence so gentle, so sunny, so loving, that there is scarcely any one in all that country side who can remember the time when they did not revere and love “FATHER BLACK.” 

Mr. BLACK graduated at Union Seminary in 1843 in the same class as Dr. MOSES D. HOGE. Each was licensed in that same year and each received ordination in 1845, and both have spent their whole ministry – the one in the city and the other in the country – in the same field in which they were ordained. Dr. Hoge is now probably the only member of the class living except “Father WILSON,” of Montgomery Presbytery. Rev. COLIN SHAW who, slightly the junior of Bro. BLACK in years, was two years his senior in the ministry is probably the only minister living who was a member of the Presbytery when Bro. BLACK was licensed. 

Mr. BLACK was twice married: first to Miss ANN HOLMES who died in 1851, and then to Miss BETSY ARMSTRONG who entered into rest a little over a year before him. By his first marriage he had two children and nine by his second; among the former was Rev. J. STEADMAN BLACK, of Fayetteville Presbytery. The character of our departed friend was one of great simplicity. One glance of his honest eyes – one smile from his genial countenance was enough. You knew the man and the Christian at once. Indomitable energy, sustaining the infirmities of increasing years, so that almost to the he continued his abundant labors among five churches; unfaltering fidelity in the discharge of every duty, however difficult and at whatever personal cost; a singular youthfulness of spirit by which he preserved his interest in old and young alike, and which made him ready to enter into all truly progressive movements in the Church; a childlike modesty that made him ready to undertake any work for the MASTER however humble, but that kept him from ever obtruding himself or “seeking his own;” above all a heart full of love to CHRIST and love to mankind; these were the qualities that characterized his life, and these were the elements that shown out in his preaching. The preaching was just the man letting his light shine in words as at other times in acts. As we have heard him in recent years it was characterized by a mellowness of style and ripeness of experience that gave it great persuasiveness. 

His funeral was attended by a large concourse from all the churches to which he ministered as well as others in the vicinity that he had served at times. The services were conducted by Rev. COLIN SHAW and Rev. A. D. McCLURE.

“““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““The Weekly Star, Wilmington NC Friday August 25, 1893 

Death of Rev. D. B. Black.

Rev. D. B. Black, senior member of Wilmington Presbytery, died at his home near Burgaw, last Sunday, in his 83rd year, and was buried yesterday at noon at Pike Church, Pender County. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Colin Shaw, of Magnolia, a life-long friend of the deceased, and Rev. A. D. McClure, of Wilmington. An immense congregation, representing the eight churches he served – Rockfish, Hopewell, Burgaw, Keith, Pike, Players’ Chapel, Duplin Roads and Mount Williams – were present. Mr. Black had been in the ministry of the Presbyterian church since 1843. He was a native of Moore County. 

“““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““““Fayetteville Observer, Fayetteville NC Thursday August 31, 1893 

Death of Rev Duncan B. Black.

We are pained to record the death of the Rev. Duncan B. Black, of the Presbyterian Church, which occurred last week at his home at Burgaw, Pender County. The deceased divine, who was the father of our esteemed county-man, Mr. Isham D. Black, of 71st, and who has a wide circle of friends and relatives in the Cape Fear section, was a pupil of Rev. Simeon Colton at the old Donaldson Academy. 

The Presbyterian of last Thursday, in the course of an extended notice, thus speaks of Mr. Black:

It is with feelings of tender sorrow that we record the death of this venerable servant of God. For nearly fifty years he has preached and lived the gospel of the SON of GOD in the group of churches that he was still serving when the fatal illness came on him that on Sunday last ended his earthly career. In all this time he has shed round about upon three and four generations of parishioners an influence so gentle, so sunny, so loving, that there is scarcely any one in all that country side who can remember the time when they did not revere and love “Father Black.” 

Mr. Black graduated at Union Seminary in 1843 in the same class as Dr. Moses D. Hoge. Each was licensed in that same year and each received ordination in 1845, and both have spent their whole ministry – the one in the city and the other in the country – in the same field in which they were ordained. Dr. Hoge is now probably the only member of the class living except “Father Wilson,” of Montgomery Presbytery. Rev. Colin Shaw who, slightly the junior of Bro. Black in years, was two years his senior in the ministry is probably the only minister living who was a member of the Presbytery when Bro. Black was licensed.

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